Not too long ago, I wrote an article for T-Nation called – Big Lats. In that article, I featured a new exercise which I named the compound row.

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Since writing the Big Lats article over 1 year ago, I still get emails almost daily form Fitness Professionals and athletes asking for more information about using the Compound Row exercise.

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In today’s post I’ve provided you will all the information needed to safely and effectively use the Compound Row exercise within your training program.

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First, watch the video to learn how to properly perform the Compound Row. Then, read all the information below the video about why the Compound Row exercise is so effective.

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The Double-Duty Lat Pull — The Compound Row

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Here’s what I wrote about the Compound Row in my – Big Lats – article originally published on T-Nation.com:

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“Let’s return to the discussion of the lats as part of the core. Because the lats insert at the iliac crest — the top of your pelvic girdle — they play a role in back extension. And when you extend your back, you’re almost always tilting the top of your pelvis forward at the same time, exaggerating the arch in your lower back.”

“A lot of guys incorporate and exaggerate back extension when they do seated close-grip rows. That is, they bend forward on the negative and then lean backward on the concentric part of each repetition. My guess is that few TMUSCLE readers do this, because more advanced lifters know that it puts unnecessary stress on the lower back, while at the same time taking work away from your upper-back muscles.”

“But there is a way to combine back extension with a close-grip pull without so much risk to your lumbar spine. It’s called the standing compound row.”

“Put the triangle extension on a high cable pulley, stand a few feet back with your feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent, and bend forward at the hips so your torso and arms create a straight line with the cable. Straighten your hips as you pull the handle to your lower chest.

“Because you’re standing, your lower back doesn’t go into as much flexion as it would if you were bending forward on a seated row. Plus, standing movements like this are always more functional. In sports, the actions requiring upper-body strength and power are almost always dependent on coordinated action with the core and lower body.”

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Give the Compound Row and try and tell me what you think on the comments section.

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